Quantcast

Boris Johnson does not have ‘pneumonia’ and is in ‘good spirits’

0

The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson is now in a stable condition and in “good spirits” after he was admitted to intensive care, Downing Street have confirmed.

On Sunday Johnson was taken to St Thomas’ Hospital in central London as a precaution after his health worsened.

The Downing Street spokesman said, “The Prime Minister has been stable overnight and remains in good spirits.

“He is receiving standard oxygen treatment and breathing without any other assistance.

“He has not required mechanical ventilation or non-invasive respiratory support.”

The spokesman further confirmed that he does not have “pneumonia.”

Downing Street rejected claims that No 10 had tried to hide the severity of Johnson’s condition.

They added, “We have been fully frank with you throughout.

“We have issued you with regular updates on the Prime Minister’s health.

“His condition worsened yesterday afternoon. A decision was taken that he needed to be moved to an intensive care unit at around 7pm.

“We informed you all as soon as was practically possible. We have a commitment to be as transparent as we can be throughout this process.”

The news comes as the UK has seen a record spike in coronavirus deaths in a single day, with 854 deaths recorded, bringing the total to 6,277.

In England another 758 patients died, after contracting coronvarius, the total now stands at 5,655, 224 of those deaths were in London.

Those who died in England were aged between 23 and 102-years old. 29 of the 758 patients, who were aged between 23 and 99-years old, had no known underlying health conditions.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has thanked NHS health workers for the “selfless dedication” whilst we are in “testing times.”

In a rare statement, released on Tuesday morning the Monarch said, “On the occasion of World Health Day, I want to thank all those working in the healthcare profession for your selfless commitment and diligence as you undertake vitally important roles to protect and improve the health and well-being of people across the commonwealth, and around the world.




Share.