Home Business News Just over one third of women say they would likely negotiate a higher salary than first offered

Just over one third of women say they would likely negotiate a higher salary than first offered

by LLB staff reporter
18th Nov 21 3:00 pm

New polling by Savanta ComRes shows women are significantly less likely than men to try and negotiate a higher salary than first offered. Just over one third of UK women said they would be likely to try and negotiate a better deal (37%), compared to half of men who said the same (51%).

Overall amongst UK adults, over two in five said the would likely try to negotiate a higher salary (44%), rising to over half of those aged 18-34 (53%) and 35-54 (52%).

The polling also shows women are less willing than men to discuss their salary with colleagues (42% vs 46% ‘willing’), although equal proportions of women and men say they are not willing to do this (42% vs 41%).

Men are more likely than women to say that they are ‘very willing’ to discuss their salary with colleagues (16% vs 13%).

Overall amongst UK adults, younger Britons (48%) are more willing to discuss their salaries with colleagues than those aged 35-54 (44%) and those aged 55+ (40%).

Across both women (63%) and men (62%), there are high levels of support for companies being legally required to include a salary range when advertising a job.

When asked what they thought the minimum wage for those aged 23 and over should be, more than half said it should be £10 or more (56%) while more than one in ten said it should be £15 or more (12%).

Three in ten (30%) said the minimum wage for those aged 23 and over should actually be less than the current (pre-April 2022) minimum of £8.91.

One in five Labour voters would back a minimum wage for those aged 23 and over of £15 or more (19%).

The minimum wage for those aged 23 and over in the UK is set to rise to £9.50 from £8.91 per hour in April 2022. But, for over half of UK adults this figure is still too low (54%), with three in ten saying it’s about right (29%) and one in ten saying its actually too high (11%).

Women (58%) and Labour voters (66%) are more likely than men (51%) and Conservative voters (50%) to say that the new over-23 minimum wage of £9.50 is too low.

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