Quantcast

Work prospects improve in London

0

The number of opportunities to work for businesses in London has increased over the last month, according to a new report.

The Reed Jobs Index reading for companies in the capital increased by two points in August to 127, a rise of one per cent on last month’s figures.

Nationally, the jobs index maintained its reading of 122 from the previous months, although this is 20 per cent high than the reading this time last year.

The Reed Salaries Index shows that pay in the capital is down one point to a reading of 98, a fall of two per cent from when the index was set at 100 in December 2009.

Salaries across the country in August fell to a reading of 97, down two points on July’s reading of 99.

While demand for new staff has increased in London, the number of opportunities for employment decreased in East Anglia, the North West and the South West. However, rising demand was measured in the North East, the West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humberside, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Demand for new staff dropped in sectors such as manufacturing, financial services and retail, while fewer jobs were also available in the public sector during August, according to the report.

Martin Warnes, managing director of reed.co.uk, said: “Even though the jobs market is flat, our figures indicate that there are a fifth more new jobs available now than there were 12 months ago.

“Employers are able to attract the people they need and are investing in the future with skilled staff such as qualified accountants, purchasing professionals and marketers.”

Meanwhile, a separate survey has found that a large number of graduates are being taken on as interns without being paid.

Of the 22,000 graduates surveyed by advice group Graduate Prospects, some 43 per cent of those taking up internships were not being paid.

Graduates Prospects chief executive Mike Hill is keen for companies to follow a code of best practice for internships.

Hill said: “Despite the hype around unpaid work experience placements over the last few years, we can see from the study that a huge proportion of interns still have to work for free.

“I have recently been involved in creating the first code of best practice for high-quality internships endorsed and supported by the government.

“It clearly states that companies offering a placement of six weeks or more should pay the national minimum wage to an intern if they are contributing to a company, have a list of duties and are working set hours.”




Share.