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Most generous gifters revealed

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While Santa will continue to deliver the best presents to children up and down the country, new research has revealed who Brits can expect to receive the most generous gifts from this Christmas. 

Women may be the fairer sex, but a survey of 1,000 UK adults, carried out by One4all, the Post Office gift card has revealed that it is in fact men who are the most generous sex. Boyfriends and husbands in particular spend on average £978.62 on gifts for their loved ones at Christmas – £171.15 more than the national average. 

On average, men spend £855.25 in total on gifts for family at Christmas, compared to women who spend £771.33 in total.

Despite men digging a little deeper at Christmas, the data shows that it’s women that are the most thoughtful – women spend 10.28 hours hand selecting gifts for friends and family compared to men who spend just 9 hours.  

Indeed, men are more likely to believe the more you spend on a gift the more a person will like it (8 per cent of men compared to 4 per cent of women), while just 46 per cent of men feel it’s the thought that counts when it comes to giving gifts, compared to 56 per cent of women. 

The survey asked respondents which family members they felt get them the best gifts at Christmas, and found that it’s mums who deliver the presents they most want with a quarter of the votes. 

Mums also give the most gifts at Christmas according to the data, handing out 20.64 to loved ones on average – 5.31 more than the national average.

Aoife Davey, group marketing manager at One4all Grift Cards commented: “It’s fascinating to see the difference in gifting habits between men and women, and the priorities each sex has when selecting gifts. 

“Men feel it’s the financial value of the gift that carries more weight, while women prefer to spend more time thinking about what the gift is rather than splashing the cash.

“This is good news for those in male dominated families, especially wives and girlfriends. That said, it’s important to remember that it really is the thought that counts, not about the how much a gift costs.”




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