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A Brexit tale of two Britains with the loyal and the disconected

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Remain voters are more loyal to brands and 43% more likely to give companies longer to fix bad customer service and rectify mistakes, brand-new political research finds.

A new report on loyalty and self-identity indicates that there are further fascinating differences between the two voting groups, indicating in more ways than one how differently the two sides of modern Britain behave, a ‘loyal’ group that ties political, social and consumption decisions more greatly to their identity, and the ‘disconnected’ who are able to change their mind more readily because their decisions are not being absorbed into their personal identities.

Remainers are 4% more likely to always vote the same in elections and 13% more likely to feel allegiance to a political party. They are also more likely to trust mainstream television.

Leavers are 72% more likely to have voted for 3+ parties in their lifetime and are more likely to switch brands across goods and service categories in the next twelve months. 10% say they would switch their referendum vote to ‘remain’ if asked today.

Where both groups cite “personal views and beliefs” to being the significant factor in influencing political opinion, nearly 1 in 3 across both groups stated they vote the same way as their parents, indicating that while voters believe in autonomy, family exerts more influence than their self identity recognises. Both groups are equally distrusting of mainstream newspapers.

The research, conducted by FlexMR, an insight-led technology company, forms a new report entitled ‘Tribes: Exploring the connection between political, social and brand loyalty’ and delved into attitudes towards brands, self-identity, family, media and politics.

Research highlights:

Remainers are more likely to stay loyal to brands

  • Nearly 1 in 2 Remain voters would give a company longer to rectify mistakes
  • Leavers are on average more likely to switch brands across 8 categories of goods and services in the next 12 months
  • Leavers are more likely to have switched brands in the last 3 years
  • Remainers are 8% more likely to try a completely new brand
  • Price is more important to leavers

Family matters, though we don’t always recognise it

  • Across remainers and leavers, 63% say everyone in their household voted the same way in the referendum.
  • Of those that know how their parents vote, 28% always vote the same way as their parents in elections
  • Family members using a brand is the most likely factor to convince someone to try a new brand.
  • Family is given a 15% weighting [equal to TV news]in how it contributes to political decision making. This is second to ‘own personal thoughts and views’ at 56%.

Remainers are more trusting of both mainstream and non-mainstream media

  • Remainers are more likely to trust mainstream TV, non-mainstream TV & publications + online publications/ independent bloggers.
  • Both leavers and remainers are equally distrusting of mainstream newspapers (least trustworthy news source)

Remainers are more loyal to brands, political parties and their views

  • 10% of leavers would switch to remain today
  • 7% of remainers would switch to leave today
  • In total 8.7% of referendum voters would change their vote to the other side, another 2.5% would choose not to vote at all (11% total)
  • Remainers are 4% more likely to always vote the same way in an election
  • Leavers are 72% more likely to have voted for 3+ parties in their lifetime
  • Remainers are 13% more likely to feel allegiance to a political party

Remainers are more likely to tie politics, brands and social issues to their identity

  • Remainers see political views, social issues, brands, economic status and their career as more important to their identity than leavers.
  • Remainers prefer brands that take a political stand, agree with their political views and are more likely to take action against brands they feel are having a negative impact on the world.
  • Leavers are more likely to consider themselves loyal (disconnect or difference in meaning?), less likely to look for new experiences and do not like to be the first to try new things

Paul Hudson, CEO FlexMR said, “These results are fascinating. Where brands are obsessed with customer loyalty and ways to influence it, this report challenges that way of thinking and instead offers a new way of looking at how to build relationships with customers. We’ve uncovered that underneath the divisive Brexit vote are two distinct groups of people that view themselves very differently, which consequently affects how and why they make decisions.”




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