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Spanish death toll drops for second day with over 34,000 recovered

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The death toll has dropped for the second day in a row in Spain, and 34,219 people have fully recovered from coronavirus.

The death toll for Saturday is 809, down from Friday’s toll of 932 whilst the total death toll across Spain stands at 11,744, and 124,736 people are known to be infected.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez is expected to announce a further extension to the lockdown across Spain.

Spain is ahead of Italy and is now the epicentre in Europe and behind the US which has 278,458 people infected with the virus with a death toll of 7,159. Italy’s figures will be released later today.

The health care system in Spain are struggling to get extra protective equipment and staff.

Tomas Toranzo, president of doctors’ union group CESM said, “The explosion of cases in Spain is not normal… it has been very poorly managed since the beginning.”

Palliative care expert, Kathryn Mannix told the BBC that people with a severe case of coronavirus wil died very “quickly.”

To help the public cope, Mannix explained how to understand the “horrible distressing” process.

She told, BBC’s Coronavirus Newcast, “Knowing what to expect because the process itself, even if it’s happening quite quickly as it is with this lung inflammation from the coronavirus, is not something that is horribly uncomfortable or horribly distressing.

Experts have warned that the peak of coronavirus will happen within a fortnight, as London has now over 1,000 deaths.

According to the Health Service Journal, the current confirmed cases across London as of, 9am on Thursday morning, stands at 1,053, with 161 more deaths in the capital on Friday.

The Department for Heath announced on Friday, “As of 9am 3 April, a total of 173,784 people have been tested of which 38,168 tested positive.

“As of 5pm on 2 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 3,605 have sadly died.” This an increase of 23% in just one day.

An NHS doctor who is on the frontline has warned that her ward is full of young people and is urging people to strictly follow the lockdown laws.

Dr Ami Jones who works at the Royal Gwent Hospital as an intensive care consultant said the hospital is “very, very busy.”

“It’s not just the vulnerable and elderly that are getting poorly, my unit is full of 20, 30 and 40-year-olds.”

NHS doctors face “grave decisions” over who lives and who dies according to new guidance issued over life saving treatment for coronavirus patients.




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