Home Business News NAO warns on water usage and the risk of water drying up

NAO warns on water usage and the risk of water drying up

by LLB Reporter
26th Mar 20 5:59 am

The National Audit Office (NAO) has published a report, saying some parts of England, especially the south-east, are at risk of running out of water owing to decreased rainfall and a need to cut the amount taken from natural waterways.

In light of this, NAO is demanding water companies to reduce the quantity of water they take out of rivers, lakes and the ground by more than 1bn litres a day, creating huge shortfalls in the coming decades. According to NAO figures, the daily demand for water in England and Wales is 14bn litres, with the equivalent of 3bn litres of that lost through leakage. People on average use 143 litres of water every 24 hours.

Graeme Wright, Chief Digital Officer for Manufacturing and Utilities at Fujitsu UK&I has shared his thoughts on the news and how through the increased use of technology water companies can optimise and deliver a calm network which causes fewer leaks. 

“It’s great to see the NAO demand change from both organisations and the government to ensure they both protect water resources in the years ahead. When it comes to the leading UK water companies, if they are to challenge themselves and reduce leakages, then they must absolutely improve the systems in place to reduce the 3bn litres water lost through leakages a day.

“Through the increased use of industrial IoT and sensors at the right points across the water network, companies can optimise and deliver a calm network which causes fewer busts and also uses AI to identify leaks much more quickly and despatch repair teams accordingly. Then, by collecting data over time and applying machine learning, water companies can also undertake predictive maintenance – fixing or replacing parts before they fail.

“By employing the latest technology and investing in its infrastructure, water companies can ensure they have full lifecycle, “systems thinking”, and “agile” approaches to become more data driven. In turn, this will not only massively reduce leakages, it will drive costs and CO2 emissions down for both the organisation and deliver lower bills to the consumer – a win-win situation for all parties”

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