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Boris Johnson reacts to our survey: "I will crack down on roadworks"

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Boris Johnson has urged Londoners to “name and shame” those who block London with disruptive roadworks.

His new proposals follow LondonlovesBusiness.com/ComRes’s survey findings that 57 per cent of London business leaders want reduced roadworks disruption to be the mayor’s number one priority.

Announcing his new “name and shame” initiative, Boris Johnson said: “Roadworks are a massive headache for Londoners, also levying a heavy toll on our economy. I have already taken action to introduce the UK’s first permit scheme which will impose fines on those companies digging up the road that fall short of the high standards this city deserves.”

The mayor called upon Londoners to use Report IT, a new reporting system on the Transport for London (TfL) website to name those who are causing disruptive roadworks. TfL would then take immediate action to hold responsible organisations fully to account and get things moving.

A total of 27 boroughs have also signed up to the Mayor’s permit scheme which imposes huge fines if roadworks aren’t completed in time.

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Deputy mayor for transport Isabel Dedring will hold weekly meeting with TfL experts to crackdown on roadworks. Some measures would include unannounced site visits and contacting top council and utility company bosses to ensure swift action to unclog roads.

Boris’s swift action on the roadworks goes on to show why he established a strong lead among business leaders. The ComRes poll conducted exclusively for LondonlovesBusiness.com shows Boris had an eight-point lead over Ken Livingstone in the 2012 race to be Mayor of London, polling 35 per cent to Ken’s 27 per cent.

Boris’s new roadworks pledge:

  • Help keep London moving by working outside peak hours, re-opening the road to traffic at peak times and, where this is not possible, working 24/7 or extended hours to complete works as quickly as possible. Diversion routes should be clearly signed.
  • Be tidy and safe with a clutter-free site so it is safe for pedestrians, cyclists and other road users.
  • Always explain what’s happening through detailed, clear and consistent signage.
  • Always have activity on site or, if not, explain why (for example if concrete is drying). 
  • Take up as little road / pavement space as possible with a compact working area and eliminating the unnecessary use of cones, safety barriers and storage of materials.

ComRes surveyed 501 London business leaders and 501 members of the public living in London online between 25 July and 2 August 2011. A further online survey was conducted among 401 members of the public and 260 business leaders living in London and the South-east between 9 August and 11 August 2011.




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