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17.6 million would struggle to recover from a financial shock or loss of income

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Millions of UK adults do not feel financially resilient and would not be able to manage a financial shock or loss of income, according to a new report from Zurich UK. Developed with neuroscientist Dr. Jack Lewis, the Cost of Resilience examines the impact that money, including having products designed to protect and insure against loss, have on feelings of resilience.

According to the research, one in three (34%) adults, the equivalent to more than 17.6 million adults across the UK, say they would not be able to recover quickly from an unexpected financial shock, such as an unanticipated period without household income or a sudden need to spend a significant sum. A further one in seven (15%) have no idea whether they would be able to cope or not.

Yet, the report found that almost a quarter (24%) of UK adults have no savings to fall back on and almost the same number (26%) do not feel in control of their life.

Feeling resilient is defined as the ability to recover from shock, emotional and financial. The study found that to feel financially resilient:

  • Nearly two in five (37%) said it required them to have savings
  • A quarter (22%) said they would need to not be in any debt
  • One in seven (17%) said they would need a secure job
  • A third (33%) said that earning between £1,000-£2,000 a month would help them to feel financially resilient. This increases to £2,000-£4,000 for almost a fifth (18%)

According to ONS, the average net UK individual income is £1,278[2] meaning that adults could be earning slightly less than the amount needed to feel financially resilient. This combined with people not being in a position to overcome a financial shock or loss of income – should they have to take time off work due to sickness – means many would struggle significantly if disaster was to strike.

While a third said they would struggle to recover from a financial shock or loss of income, only one in ten (11%) have Income Protection, a financial product that shields your pay against illness, injury or being unable to work. Instead, people are more likely to have insurance for their home (71%), holidays (70%) and mobile phone (18%).

There are misconceptions with products such as income protection, often with the price being too expensive being the most common.  For a 35 year old professional earning the average salary of £27,000[3], wanting to protect 50% of their net income, it can cost as little as £9 a month –  less than one medium coffee (£2.50) a week over the course of a month. The policy holder would benefit from a payout for up to two years if they were unable to work due to illness or injury.




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