Quantcast

Five questions to ask yourself before you start an airport shuttle business

0

Some people prefer to leave their cars at home and use a shuttle to the airport. The idea of paying long term parking fees is not appealing which makes a shuttle ride the next best option, especially when traveling with the family. All they want is a convenient and comfortable way to reach the airport and get back home when they get back.

With the pain point already existing, you have in your hands an idea that can earn you some cash if you can effectively meet the demand of such clients. Before you start an airport shuttle business, however, here are five questions you need to ask yourself.

1. How do you secure low airport parking fees?

Clients expect to find the shuttle waiting for them when they jet in. This means that you need to plan for airport parking fees to avoid inconveniencing your clients. If operating around large airports such as JFK, consider using services like JFK parking to find the lowest rates.

2. Who is your target market?

This question should be your number one concern and with good reason. There are a lot of people willing to use shuttles to the airport, but narrowing down your target market to a specific niche will give you a better understanding of their needs and how to meet them. For instance, targeting corporates may not require children high seats unlike targeting families.

3. What legal requirements do you need?

Like any other business, your airport shuttle business will require some legal documents. For instance, you will need a business permit for your office premises, administrative costs, insurance, and other license fees.

It is paramount that you have all the legal documents before you start your business for obvious reasons. If a legal problem was to lead to a suit, an illegally operating company would sink you dipper into trouble.

4. Will you offer booking services?

Parkos will advice you that offering booking services is the ideal way to fill up your shuttle. However, booking also comes with a few unexpected challenges.

A flight may be delayed, or a client may cancel a trip which will affect the shuttle ride. If these last-minute changes occur, you need to have a plan in place. Will you charge for changes, cancellations, and late coming? What percentage will be refunded to a customer?

Some people book their trips early, and they may prefer to book shuttle services in advance as well. Consider the length of a booking period and if it is viable for your business.

5. What will your day look like?

Every new business is majorly dependent on its owner before employees come on board. By the time this happens, you will have determined if you prefer to run things at the office or interact with people during a bus ride.

However, your typical day will involve managing shuttle schedule, supervising drivers, accepting bookings and freeing up cancellations, marketing, transporting customers and performing routine vehicle maintenance.

Conclusion

Any new business will require hard work and a lot of input and an airport shuttle business is no different. With these questions, you can determine how to structure your business and what you need to get started.




Share.