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This graph shows the sickening extent of the Qatar World Cup deaths

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A total of 1,200 migrant workers have died so far in construction since the 2022 Qatar World Cup was awarded.

Even Fifa president Sepp Blatter has admitted deciding to hold the event there was “a mistake”, due to scorching summer temperatures which are too hot to play football.

We’ve already reported on the incredible corruption allegations at Fifa over the football event, but another sickening truth has come to light – that 1,200 mostly Nepali workers have died, and the death toll could reach 4,000 by the time the event is held.

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An investigation by the Mirror found workers were subjected to appalling working conditions in the cripplingly hot temeratures, including being beaten and paid just 57p an hour, which can be withheld for months at a time.

Workers are allegedly lured to the country by false promises of high salaries and then become trapped after employers take their passports. Under feudal kafala law, employees are bonded to employers and not allowed to quit or leave the country without their employer’s permission.

This is the RICHEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.

Meanwhile, we heard one worker building a World Cup stadium in Brazil was electrocuted, becoming the eighth worker to die in preparation for this summer’s World Cup.

Looking at how these figures compare to previous sporting events reveals just how truly shocking the Qatar deaths are.

Qatar World Cup graph updated

Qatar responds

*UPDATED 4 June 2015*

The state of Qatar has responded to the ITUC’s figures from this article.

It said: “These figures have absolutely no basis in fact. After almost 5 million man-hours of work, there have been no fatal industrial accidents on World Cup projects. Not one.”

Read the full statement: EXCLUSIVE: Qatar fights back – “No workers have died on Qatar World Cup projects”

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